Lynn’s Tuesday Picture Prompt – Week 36

Well, February is just about half-way finished. And with that, each day gets us closer to springtime and a return to warmer weather.

Nevertheless, it is Tuesday and that means “Lynn’s Tuesday Picture Prompt.”

Art(including pictures and images) should evoke an emotional response in those who are viewing them. That’s why art can leave such a long-lasting and poignant imprint within the depths of our psyche

Your challenge or writing prompt is this:

  • what emotions or feelings get evoked or aroused in you when you look at this photograph taken by Lynn

Remember, the goal isn’t necessarily to tell me and others exactly what the picture is.

The creative goal for all of us is “what does the picture evoke in you; what emotion; feeling; memory or whatever it may be – what does it arouse in you and to share it that with others.

Our Week 36 picture was taken at dusk in the Town of Thornbury on the shores of Georgian Bay. It is an abandoned railway bridge that has been repurposed as part of the Georgian Multi-use Trail system.

A few points to help along the way:

  • write a post on your own blog and create a pingback to link back to the original post(this one)
  • I’ll reblog your post on my blog when I get the notification
  • write an original story; perhaps your own thoughts; maybe some poetry or even a simply one word response. Maybe even post that says “it does nothing; means nothing”
  • regardless, whatever you write must encapsulate the emotion or feeling evoked or aroused in you from the picture
  • no limit on the length(I guess)
  • keep it a “family friendly” as possible(not looking to delete or not approve stuff)

Be sure to tag your responses with:

#lynntuesdaypictureprompt or

#ltpp

Looking forward to your thoughts!

— get outdoors; find inspiration; discover yourself —

Georgian Trail – Collingwood

This whole social distancing thing is really putting a “damper” so to speak on getting outdoors for some serious outdoor adventure. All Provincial and National Parks, as well as most Conservation Areas, are closed for use at this time. This includes the Bruce Trail as well.

Closure of all parks and such certainly has polarized the outdoor community. Most understand the reasons behind the closures. Unfortunately, there are very vocal outdoor enthusiasts who almost take a form of bizarre pleasure in boldly stating, the social isolation and distancing measures do not apply to themselves.

I’ve dropped out of or muted(not sure what the correct phrase is) a number of FB outdoor groups I belonged to, due to the pure and unadulterated viciousness that some members directed to others in these groups.

Although Lynn and I certainly do miss with great sadness our ability to hike through Algonquin Park or a day out along the Bruce Trail, we’re not having a mental breakdown, as some are suggesting they’re having because they can’t go winter or spring camping, let alone the opening of spring trout season.

But, enough about this. I’ve come to realize, it is simply natural for some to be selfish and focus solely on their own needs and desires. On the other hand, it is also good to remember that karma can be a bitch.

Just about a year ago, Lynn and I hiked along the Georgian Trail through Collingwood and along the shores of Georgian Bay. To say it was a sloppy and wet hike, would be a gross understatement.

From April 10, 2019

One place or trail that we’ve talked about getting to over the years, is “The Georgian Trail” along the pristine shores of Georgian Bay. The trail runs approximately 34 kilometres between Collingwood and Meaford.

The trail as we experience it today was originally The Northern Railway Line that connected Collingwood and Meaford. It was constructed in 1872 and used extensively hauling rail goods until the line was deemed unnecessary and abandoned by the Canadian National Railway(CNR) in 1984.

trail

In 1988, a feasibility study recommended keeping the abandoned rail corridor in public hands and to be developed as a recreational trail. In October 1989, The Georgian Trail officially opened to the public.

DSC_0040

Leaving the “old homestead” mid-morning, it was a leisurely drive over to Collingwood with us arriving close to noon. We parked our car at the south-west corner of a large commercial plaza putting us pretty much adjacent to an entry point for the trail.

Screen Shot 2019-04-10 at 5.21.26 AM

Collecting our gear, we headed off for another afternoon of discovery and yes – fun.

DSC_0014-Edit

As the name suggests, it was originally a railway corridor. As we all know, railway lines are generally flat and run for the most part in a straight line. The Georgian Trail is no different. One of the neat aspects of the trail, however, is it connects with other trails within the Town of Collingwood and other communities along the way, creating a myriad of options for a day’s adventure.

DSC_0013

There had been a fairly significant spring snowfall a couple of days before we headed over to Collingwood. Although the trail was well packed-down, the snow and ice started to turn to slush as the afternoon wore on. In addition, with it being spring and that ever welcoming rise in temperatures, there was significant standing water in the low areas adjacent to the trail.

The following was the route we took for the afternoon. In the top part of the photo above the yellow line, is one of the many resort developments in the area. This one is the Living Stone Golf Resort, formally known as Cranberry Village and one of the original resort developments in the Collingwood area.

Screen Shot 2019-04-09 at 5.17.38 AM

To the south, there is some industrial development. Noise from heavy machinery and trucks was quite loud at times. The potential for noise in a semi-urban/rural environment should be anticipated. Although loud, making the choice to ignore it and enjoy being outdoors, maybe the best and only option available along this part of the trail.

DSC_0023-Edit

We kept trucking along, with Lynn madly taking pictures at every available moment and of every object worth capturing with her camera.

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This slideshow requires JavaScript.

As I mentioned, a tad wet in some areas.

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Trying to look regal and dignified. Not sure if I achieved it or not.

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Along the length of the trail we covered, there are numerous signboards with information regarding the trail and as well benches to stop and have a rest if you need to.

I think this is the best picture of the day.

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At one or two points along the trail, you can connect to other trail options. This one took you up and through the Living Stone Resort golf course.

DSC_0066-EditAfter 2 or 3 kilometres along The Georgian Trail, we came across the “George Christie Nature Trails.” It is a series of trails looping through a mixed forest of hardwood and cedar and appears to be a favourite go-to spot for cross-country skiers, snowshoers and hikers.

DSC_0071

We did about a 3-kilometre loop through this part. There were many low areas that were flooded or at least heavily saturated with water as we found out. So did our boots and socks, unfortunately.

Even the woods were smiling at us today. Made the day all that much more enjoyable. We all need a happy and cheerful log.

DSC_0076

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The trails starting to melt and get sloppy as the afternoon wore on.DSC_0110-Edit

Lots of texture and opportunities to compose some interesting and effective shots.

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Woodpeckers have had quite the go on this tree.

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Spring hiking does have its drawbacks. Water and wet boots are certainly one of the somewhat negative results.

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After coming out of the forest portion, the trail followed this fenceline before turning right at the trees in the background of the picture. It all seemed simple enough, other than the field was flooded and flooded for several hundred metres to the right of what is in the picture.

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We actually had to gingerly maneuver several hundred metres down the field to find a slightly higher location that wasn’t quite so wet as everything other spot in the field.

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Slowly and carefully working our way across. Not that it mattered much, as our boots were pretty much soaked by this point.

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An abandoned jeep just before we turned right onto the 11th Line to head the 1.5 kilometres north to eventually re-connect with the Georgian Trail.

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Wet and still wet areas.

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The story of my life…just a blur in someone else’s existence.

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While heading back along the rail trail, Lynn became obsessed with taking pictures bulrushes or cattails.

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We spent 3 to 4 hours out and covered approximately 8 kilometres in total.

Although the day was dull and gloomy, it was still a great afternoon outside. As Lynn often says, it is our attitude that will determine how the day goes. You can get all pouty and miserable because of the weather, or be thankful that you’re outside, while others may not have this opportunity.

If you’re in the area, make a point of checking out some of the trails in the Collingwood area, especially The Georgian Trail. As it is also a bike trail, one could make a wonderful day trip from Collingwood all the way to Meaford or any location along the way.

Thanks for reading.

 

 

 

—  get outdoors; find inspiration; discover yourself  —

 

Georgian Trail – Collingwood

One place or trail that we’ve talked about getting to over the years, is “The Georgian Trail” along the pristine shores of Georgian Bay. The trail runs approximately 34 kilometres between Collingwood and Meaford.

The trail as we experience it today was originally The Northern Railway Line that connected Collingwood and Meaford. It was constructed in 1872 and used extensively hauling rail goods until the line was deemed unnecessary and abandoned by the Canadian National Railway(CNR) in 1984.

trail

In 1988, a feasibility study recommended keeping the abandoned rail corridor in public hands and to be developed as a recreational trail. In October 1989, The Georgian Trail officially opened to the public.

DSC_0040

Leaving the “old homestead” mid-morning, it was a leisurely drive over to Collingwood with us arriving close to noon. We parked our car at the south-west corner of a large commercial plaza putting us pretty much adjacent to an entry point for the trail.

Screen Shot 2019-04-10 at 5.21.26 AM

Collecting our gear, we headed off for another afternoon of discovery and yes – fun.

DSC_0014-Edit

As the name suggests, it was originally a railway corridor. As we all know, railway lines are generally flat and run for the most part in a straight line. The Georgian Trail is no different. One of the neat aspects of the trail, however, is it connects with other trails within the Town of Collingwood and other communities along the way, creating a myriad of options for a day’s adventure.

DSC_0013

There had been a fairly significant spring snowfall a couple of days before we headed over to Collingwood. Although the trail was well packed-down, the snow and ice started to turn to slush as the afternoon wore on. In addition, with it being spring and that ever welcoming rise in temperatures, there was significant standing water in the low areas adjacent to the trail.

The following was the route we took for the afternoon. In the top part of the photo above the yellow line, is one of the many resort developments in the area. This one is the Living Stone Golf Resort, formally known as Cranberry Village and one of the original resort developments in the Collingwood area.

Screen Shot 2019-04-09 at 5.17.38 AM

To the south, there is some industrial development. Noise from heavy machinery and trucks was quite loud at times. The potential for noise in a semi-urban/rural environment should be anticipated. Although loud, making the choice to ignore it and enjoy being outdoors, maybe the best and only option available along this part of the trail.

DSC_0023-Edit

We kept trucking along, with Lynn madly taking pictures at every available moment and of every object worth capturing with her camera.

DSC_0025

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

As I mentioned, a tad wet in some areas.

DSC_0053_HDR

Trying to look regal and dignified. Not sure if I achieved it or not.

DSC_0064

Along the length of the trail we covered, there are numerous signboards with information regarding the trail and as well benches to stop and have a rest if you need to.

I think this is the best picture of the day.

DSC_0065

At one or two points along the trail, you can connect to other trail options. This one took you up and through the Living Stone Resort golf course.

DSC_0066-EditAfter 2 or 3 kilometres along The Georgian Trail, we came across the “George Christie Nature Trails.” It is a series of trails looping through a mixed forest of hardwood and cedar and appears to be a favourite go-to spot for cross-country skiers, snowshoers and hikers.

DSC_0071

We did about a 3-kilometre loop through this part. There were many low areas that were flooded or at least heavily saturated with water as we found out. So did our boots and socks, unfortunately.

Even the woods were smiling at us today. Made the day all that much more enjoyable. We all need a happy and cheerful log.

DSC_0076

DSC_0084-EditDSC_0085DSC_0082

The trails starting to melt and get sloppy as the afternoon wore on.DSC_0110-Edit

Lots of texture and opportunities to compose some interesting and effective shots.

DSC_0087-Edit-EditDSC_0107

DSC_0105-Edit

Woodpeckers have had quite the go on this tree.

DSC_0117-Edit

Spring hiking does have its drawbacks. Water and wet boots are certainly one of the somewhat negative results.

DSC_0120-Edit

DSC_0125-Edit

After coming out of the forest portion, the trail followed this fenceline before turning right at the trees in the background of the picture. It all seemed simple enough, other than the field was flooded and flooded for several hundred metres to the right of what is in the picture.

DSC_0126-Edit

We actually had to gingerly maneuver several hundred metres down the field to find a slightly higher location that wasn’t quite so wet as everything other spot in the field.

DSC_0129-Edit

DSC_0130

Slowly and carefully working our way across. Not that it mattered much, as our boots were pretty much soaked by this point.

DSC_0133-Edit

DSC_0137

An abandoned jeep just before we turned right onto the 11th Line to head the 1.5 kilometres north to eventually re-connect with the Georgian Trail.

DSC_0142_HDR-Edit

DSC_0140-Edit

Wet and still wet areas.

DSC_0152-EditDSC_0160-Edit

The story of my life…just a blur in someone else’s existence.

DSC_0163

While heading back along the rail trail, Lynn became obsessed with taking pictures bulrushes or cattails.

DSC_0168-EditDSC_0169-Edit

DSC_0171-Edit

DSC_0172DSC_0173-Edit

We spent 3 to 4 hours out and covered approximately 8 kilometres in total.

Although the day was dull and gloomy, it was still a great afternoon outside. As Lynn often says, it is our attitude that will determine how the day goes. You can get all pouty and miserable because of the weather, or be thankful that you’re outside, while others may not have this opportunity.

If you’re in the area, make a point of checking out some of the trails in the Collingwood area, especially The Georgian Trail. As it is also a bike trail, one could make a wonderful day trip from Collingwood all the way to Meaford or any location along the way.

Thanks for reading.

 

 

 

—  get outdoors; find inspiration; discover yourself  —

 

A Winter’s Afternoon In Thornbury

It has been a week or two since we’ve been on a hard packed trail or knee-deep in snow hiking to one of our favourite spots somewhere in the Beaver Valley or in North Muskoka, or anywhere for that matter. Life and its day-to-day happenings which always get in the way of outdoor pursuits, well they seemed to keep getting in the way. Although, we did manage to hit up Huntsville, ON for the Banff Mountain Film Festival back on January 24th. That ended up being one pretty awesome evening at the Algonquin Theatre.

Last Friday, we headed over to Collingwood to meet with a young lady who is purchasing this particular photo that Lynn captured last year. The picture, which I think is mighty spectacular, ended up being the winner of the “Experience Collingwood’s” 2017 photography competition.

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To our shock and somewhat pleasant surprise, the lady has decorated and designed her living room with the concept that this photograph will become its centre-piece. Making a long story short we’re looking at creating three-panel photo totalling 60 inches long by 20 inches in height.

So, after finishing up in Collingwood, we decided to head on over to Thornbury and Meaford to hike and explore the waterfront.

A few pictures from the afternoon.

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Frozen waterfront of Georgian Bay

1
Patiently waiting for a mid-summer night’s sunset

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Foggy ski hills in the background

2
Waiting for another summer’s evening

3
Smallish Condo’s

6
Where “old fishing lures” go to retire

4
Old Railway Bridge – Georgian Trail Thornbury

5
Old Railway Bridge – Georgian Trail Thornbury

7
Old Railway Bridge – Georgian Trail Thornbury

So, when life got in the way and to keep sanity or insanity levels to something manageable, an afternoon hiking along the Georgian Bay waterfront did the trick. And life does get in the way. It gets in the way for all of us. And when it does, getting outside to give ourselves a much-needed mental health break and body re-fueling at times requires being diligent, determined and focused. For many people taking an afternoon to hike a few kilometres on the Bruce Trail or spend a couple of hours walking along something like the Georgian Trail would be unthinkable. We all know that someone who needs every waking hour to be productive with some sort of measurable results or else their day seems wasted.

Nevertheless, warm temperatures, a sun that filled the sky and few hours outside made the world of difference.

Every outing doesn’t have to or need to be an epic adventure worthy of being on the National Geographic channel. Nope, sometimes they just need to be ………………………an outing.

Thanks for reading.